Safety & Security

Goal 4: Youth Activity
Source: Mayors Office     SS Goal4     7/1/2013
About this measure:
The Lincoln Police Department annually measures the number of juvenile crimes within a one mile radius of F Street and Belmont community centers. The number of juvenile crimes has decreased in the last five years and was less than 350 in both 2011 and 2012.
Why this is important:
Research indicates an average daily spike in juvenile crime including shoplifting, burglary, assault, drug use, robbery, and vandalism, beginning at 3:00 p.m. Engaging youth in after school programs at community centers reduces the likelihood that they will take part in criminal activities.
What is being done:
The Parks & Recreation Department provides youth after school programming at F Street and Belmont community centers. In addition the department operates a community learning center at Goodrich Middle School and provides funding support to a community learning center at Park Middle School.



Source: Lincoln Parks & Recreation     SS Goal4     7/11/2013
About this measure:
Data is collected using participant surveys. A year-to-year benchmark comparison is being used to compare results over time.
Why this is important:
Program satisfaction by youth leads to greater participation. Participants should develop meaningful connections with staff, feel safe, report personal growth in physical, social and academic skills. Programs are valuable in reducing juvenile crime which data show spikes at 3 pm when school gets out and before parents are home.
What is being done:
The Parks & Recreation Department offers before and after school programs at eight locations in lower socio-economic status neighborhoods during the academic year. Six of these locations are associated with the Lincoln Community Learning Center Initiative. About six hundred school age youth participate daily in these programs. The Parks & Recreation Department also offers day camps at nine locations during summer months.



Source: Lincoln Parks & Recreation     SS Goal4     7/11/2013
About this measure:
Data is collected using participant surveys. A year-to-year benchmark comparison is being used to compare results over time.
Why this is important:
Program quality and affordability leads to greater participation.
What is being done:
The Parks & Recreation Department offers before and after school programs at eight locations in lower socio-economic status neighborhoods during the academic year. Six of these locations are associated with the Lincoln Community Learning Center Initiative. About six hundred school age youth participate daily in these programs. The Parks & Recreation Department also offers day camps at nine locations during summer months.



Source: Lincoln Parks & Recreation     SS Goal4     7/11/2013
About this measure:
A ratio of the number of children registering for swim programs compared to the number of school age youth provides an indication of the portion of children who are involved in organized swimming programs. A year-to-year benchmark comparison will be used to compare results over time.
Why this is important:
The ability to swim is a life safety skill. The National Center for Disease Control reports that the United States experiences about 10 unintentional drowning deaths per day. Swimming skills can help reduce that number.
What is being done:
The Parks & Recreation Department offers learn to swim programs, recreational swimming, and diving league programs. Scholarships are available to children from low-income families.