Safety & Security

Goal 3: Traffic Safety
Source: Lincoln Police Department     SS Goal3     3/17/2014
About this measure:
This data is drawn from traffic accident investigation reports prepared by police officers. Data pertaining to Lincoln traffic accidents is compiled monthly and annually by the police department, public works department and State Department of Roads Accident Records Bureau.
Why this is important:
This tracks the rate of injury traffic crashes across time. Traffic crashes are a major threat to public safety. The target rate of no more than 850 per 100,000 is based on a ten-year analysis of Lincoln’s injury crashes.
What is being done:
Traffic accident investigation; traffic safety information and awareness programs; selective traffic enforcement; general traffic enforcement and traffic direction/control are used to minimize risk to residents and property and to enhance orderly transportation.



Source: Public Works and Utilities Department     SS Goal3     3/27/2013
About this measure:
Times are determined when snow plow operators report route completions to the snow command center. Lincoln’s Snow Removal Plan divides the City’s arterial streets into 19 different snow routes. Four plows are deployed to each of these roughly 50 mile routes after a snow event begins. They continuously plow the arterial streets on their routes until the snowfall has stopped and the arterial streets are open to traffic. Arterial streets are the first priority and on the average, typically take 11-15 hours to complete, following the end of the storm.
Why this is important:
The safety and well-being of citizens depends on safe streets for traffic. Streets that are difficult to drive also impact economic development as commerce depends on citizen access. Approximately 560 lane miles of arterial streets are identified as “Emergency Snow Routes”. Keeping these “Emergency Snow Routes” and other arterial streets open to traffic both during and immediately following a snow storm are top priorities.
What is being done:
The City’s Snow Removal Plan breaks each storm into four phases. Phase 1 of the plan includes the spreading of de-icing materials, primarily rock salt with approximately 26 personnel using 26 pieces of equipment on 19 key routes, each about 60 miles long. Phases 2 and 3 involve the plowing of the 19 routes, requiring an additional 62 pieces of equipment and as many as 150 more personnel. During Phase 4 residential streets and any other streets that are not considered an arterial streets, bus routes or school routes are plowed.

City staff from several different departments cooperate in removing snow including Public Works Street Operations, Water, Wastewater, Landfill, Fleet Services, Traffic and Engineering Services Divisions and the Parks & Recreation, Police and Fire Departments. Local area street construction and land contractors, area farmers also contribute a portion of the equipment and personnel.



Source: Public Works and Utilities Department     SS Goal3     3/27/2013
About this measure:
This measure takes into account the fact that the first priority during and following a snow storm, is to keep our arterial streets, bus routes and school routes open to traffic. It typically takes 11 to 15 hours to complete snow removal efforts on these major streets and another 24 and 36 hours to complete the remainder of the streets.
Why this is important:
With 4" or more of snow, motorists begin experiencing a great deal of difficulty maneuvering safely. With the need for residents to drive to work and to safely transport their children to and from school, efficient and effective snow removal operations which provide for at least one clear travel lane on all City streets within 30 hours following the end of a storm, is crucial for the economic stability of our community and the safety of our citizens.
What is being done:
The City has a Snow Removal Plan that breaks each storm into four potential phases. This plan may or may not be completely implemented, depending on the amount of snowfall. In order to execute this plan, the City utilizes approximately 190 pieces of equipment and up to 400 personnel. Local area street construction and land contractors, plus area farmers make up half of the equipment and personnel, while the remainder is made up from City staff from the Public Works Street Operations, Water, Wastewater, Landfill, Fleet Services, Traffic and Engineering Services Divisions and the Parks & Recreation, Police and Fire Departments.