Safety & Security

Goal 2: Timely & effective incident management
Source: Lincoln Fire & Rescue     SS Goal2     3/21/2013
About this measure:
LFR personnel attempts to conduct a customer satisfaction survey with the party calling for service every sixth call Citizens are asked about their recent experience with LFR and how the organization can best meet our customers’ needs. Each satisfaction measure is scaled to identify specific areas for improvement. This data is updated at the conclusion of each month.
Why this is important:
A comprehensive customer satisfaction program ensures that LFR is delivering the quality level expected by Lincoln residents.
What is being done:
Customer satisfaction results are reviewed by management staff to determine whether process improvements and/or training can be made to improve service.
Note: Refer to the LF&R Homepage for Additional Information



Source: Lincoln Fire & Rescue     SS Goal2     3/21/2013
About this measure:
The eight minute ambulance response is required by City of Lincoln Municipal Code. The data is extracted from the 911 call center computer aided dispatch (CAD) system and transferred to the LFR records management system. The data measures the time elapsed from receipt of an emergency call at the 911 center until the arrival of an ambulance at the scene of the emergency. The standard focuses on life threatening emergency calls, such as stroke, difficulty breathing, and cardiac arrest. This data is updated at the conclusion of each month.
Why this is important:
Quick response times equate to more rapid provision of potentially life saving emergency medical services and better patient outcomes.
What is being done:
LF&R records and reviews the ambulance response times to every life threatening emergency. This comprehensive data is then mapped and analyzed on an individual basis. When the response time indicator is not met, a more detailed analysis of the call data is completed to determine the cause and what we can do to meet this measure in the future. This goal is monitored by an independent medical oversight authority for compliance.

In 2004 LF&R evaluated the current deployment of ambulances. We applied methodology learned through the accreditation process, GIS, and private industry standards to develop an entirely new response strategy. This response strategy proved to equalize the workload of ambulances crews, improve response times, and increase the amount of time the ambulances were available to respond to emergencies as a whole. The study results were implemented and proved to be very successful.
Note: Refer to the LF&R Homepage for Additional Information



*Turn-out time is the amount of time it takes firefighters upon being dispatched to an incident to get to their response vehicle and begin to travel to the call for service.
Source: Lincoln Fire & Rescue     SS Goal2     3/21/2013
About this measure:
Turnout time is the amount of time it takes firefighters to get to their response vehicle and begin to travel after being dispatched by the 911 call center. The National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) sets turn-out time performance standards of 60 seconds for medical incidents and 80 seconds for fire and rescue incidents. The data displayed in the above graph is LFR’s turn-out time performance combined for all calls. The data is extracted directly from the 911 center computer aided dispatch (CAD) system to the LF&R records management system and updated at the end of each month. Only the data from life threatening events are measured.
Why this is important:
A shorter turn-out time equals a shorter total response time. Quick response times equate to more rapid provision of potentially life saving emergency medical services and better patient outcomes.
What is being done:
Evaluation: LFR evaluates turn out time performance by individual employee and individual apparatus to improve performance and address any potential issues. In 2012 LFR placed turn-out time performance at the top of our list of performance improvement goals. In 2013 the focus is on employee education as well as clear communication as to individual, unit, and organizational performance.

Process: LFR is evaluating fire station designs and the efficacy of improvements which provide firefighters the optimal rapid response process.

Technology: Technologies exist that assist and promote better turn-out time performance. LFR is actively evaluating these systems and seeking alternative funding mechanisms to make them a reality.
Note: Refer to the LF&R Homepage for Additional Information



Source: Lincoln Fire & Rescue     SS Goal2     3/21/2013
*A decrease in performance in 2011 is depicted due to the significant loss of the Lincoln Public Schools Administration building.
About this measure:
The data for this measure is a calculated mathematical formula derived from several inputs measuring property saved and property lost. Data is collected from LFR records management system and combined with property value information from the Lancaster County Assessors’ Office. This data is compiled annually. The decrease in performance in 2011 is due to the significant loss associated with the Lincoln Public Schools Administration building fire.
Why this is important:
Comparing the value of property lost and saved to previous years allows the organization to evaluate its efforts in fire education, prevention, and response. An increase in fire loss can be an indicator that current efforts need to be modified.
What is being done:
LFR will continue to monitor, identify, and respond to trends. Any negative trend will result in review of current operating policies and or procedures and reallocation of efforts into the identified deficiency.
Note: Refer to the LF&R Homepage for Additional Information



Source: Lincoln Fire & Rescue     SS Goal2     3/21/2013
About this measure:
Travel time data is extracted directly from the 911 call center computer aided dispatch (CAD) system to the LF&R records management system. The data is mapped and analyzed using fractal analysis per the industry standard. LF&R utilizes fractal analysis to determine department performance. Fractal performance measure more accurately depicts organizational performance as compared to averages. When evaluating performance in averages a few great performances can negate many lousy performances. When measuring performance in fractals, performance is measured in whether we met the standard or we didn’t. The fact is, our performance is important to our customer’s lives. Thus, when evaluating organizational performance from a fractal perspective, we only receive credit for the responses where we meet our response time objectives. The data displayed in the above graph is LF&R travel time performance for life threatening calls for service only.

LF&R utilizes the National Fire Protection Standard 1710 as the measurement criteria for all components of response time. This allows the organization to compare itself to the fire service industry as a whole. This data is compiled annually.
Why this is important:
Travel time is a component of response time that begins when the response vehicle begins to respond to the emergency to when it arrives at the emergency scene. It is imperative that LF&R analyze all of the components of response time because in a service industry, particularly an emergency service industry, time is critical to the outcome. A rapid response results in better patient outcomes and a lessening of property and environmental impacts.
What is being done:
LF&R recognizes that as the City of Lincoln continues to grow and expand, that our current infrastructure will be strained. It is our commitment to our customers that we ensure that we are responding in an effective yet efficient manner. We are constantly asking the question, “How we can better use the resources we have to serve the public?”

In 2004 LF&R evaluated the current deployment of ambulances. We applied methodology learned through the accreditation process, GIS, and private industry standards to develop an entirely new response strategy. This response strategy proved to equalize the workload of ambulances crews, improve response times, and increase the amount of time the ambulances were available to respond to emergencies as a whole. This study was implemented and proved very successful.
In 2012 LF&R applied this same methodology in a comprehensive study titled LF&R Station Optimization Plan. This study was one of the most comprehensive and in depth studies ever performed in the fire service in terms of station location. Several options were developed and presented to community leaders. These options included the moving of existing station locations in addition to the building of new stations which would place our existing apparatus and personnel in better positions to respond more quickly to life threatening calls for service.

LF&R believes strongly in a public service organization driven by our customers’ needs coupled with industry standards. This is accomplished through measures such as travel time. A trend which reveals a decrease in travel time can be an indicator that the current deployment model needs to be adjusted or that additional infrastructure needs to be added. Regardless, LF&R will continue to publish organizational travel time to ensure that our customers are informed as to how their fire and rescue service is performing.
Note: Refer to the LF&R Homepage for Additional Information



Source: Lincoln Fire & Rescue     SS Goal2     3/21/2013
*LF&R is meeting this goal 100% of the time.
About this measure:
Data is extracted from the 911 call center computer aided dispatch (CAD) system to the LF&R records management system. Information identifying stroke patients is generated from the LF&R EMS reporting system. Hospitals additionally compile information regarding the outcomes of the patients they receive. This data is compiled at the end of each month.
Why this is important:
Strokes are an emergency. Strokes can reduce or occlude oxygenated blood from reaching tissues within the brain. The brain tissues affected can become irreversibly damaged decreasing the patient’s quality of life or some cases, even resulting in death. Medications to address strokes must be administered at a hospital and given within a limited window of time making rapid transport of stroke patients a critical component of a successful outcome.
What is being done:
Patient outcome is the result of active cooperation among the players in Lincoln’s health care system. Protocols for LFR paramedic field evaluations and transport of stroke patients are set by an independent medical oversight board and lead physician. LFR paramedics communicate with hospitals while in the field so emergency rooms personnel can more quickly respond to the situation.

LF&R actively evaluates call times and performance for all medical responses involving strokes, including patient outcomes in order to continuously improve service and provide the citizens of Lincoln with excellent effective pre-hospital health care.
Note: Refer to the LF&R Homepage for Additional Information



Source: Lincoln Fire & Rescue     SS Goal2     3/21/2013
About this measure:
Technology advancement allows LFR to measure the quality of CPR we provide to our customers. LFR equipment measures chest compression performed by paramedics. After care is delivered data is downloaded from the field provider’s medical equipment and compiled utilizing a software program.. This data is updated at the conclusion of each month.
Why this is important:
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) is the method of providing oxygen and blood circulation through the delivery of rescue breathing and chest compressions to victims of sudden cardiac arrest. This procedure ensures that a critical flow of oxygenated blood is maintained to the brain and other vital organs during a resuscitation attempt. According to the American Heart Association guidelines, high-quality CPR, particularly effective chest compressions, contributes significantly to the successful resuscitation of cardiac arrest patients.
What is being done:
Data is shared with the paramedics who performed CPR so they can see their performance against our established baselines and if necessary, modify field practices to ensure that quality CPR is being provided to our patients.
Note: Refer to the LF&R Homepage for Additional Information