Livable Neighborhoods

Provide community spaces and programs that enhance neighborhood vitality
Source: Library Department     LN Goal5     5/28/2014
About this measure:
The measure indicates the number of children, teens, and adults who have attended a library sponsored programs. Not all programs are held in a library facility; for example, some summer reading programs are held offsite due to size of library branch and large turnouts. These offsite numbers are included in attendance counts.
Why this is important:
Libraries are unique in that they offer lifelong learning – and welcome everyone from preschool age to well beyond retirement age. Programs are designed and tailored to meet local community needs. Programs bring new families to our libraries.
What is being done:
The library continues to plan and carryout programs for users of all ages, engaging users, and reinforcing literacy in our community. We evaluate programs for overall effectiveness and efficiency.



Source: Lincoln Parks & Recreation     LN Goal5     7/11/2013
About this measure:
The number of outdoor public pools in Lincoln is compared against peer cities. National average for 75 largest cities is 2.7 outdoor public pools per 100,000 residents. 2011 Park Facts prepared by the Trust for Public Lands.
Why this is important:
Outdoor public pools should be geographically distributed throughout the community, and have adequate capacity to assure residents access to water recreation activities during summer months.
What is being done:
The Parks and Recreation Department operates and provides programming at nine outdoor public pools.



Note: Peer cities used for comparison are Des Moines, IA, Omaha, NE, Overland Park, KS, Sioux Falls, SD, and Wichita, KS.
Source: Lincoln Parks & Recreation     LN Goal5     7/11/2013
About this measure:
The number of parks in Lincoln is compared against peer cities. National average for 75 largest cities is 3.9 parks per 10,000 residents. 2011 Park Facts prepared by the Trust for Public Lands.
Why this is important:
The number of parks per residents provides a general indication of the distribution and accessibility of parks within the community. It is a goal in Lincoln to have a neighborhood park area within ½ mile of each residence.
What is being done:
The Parks & Recreation Department is responsible for acquisition, development, and maintenance of public parks throughout the community. The Department currently manages 133 park areas (designed lands, natural lands, undeveloped park sites).



Note: Peer cities used for comparison are Des Moines, IA, Omaha, NE, Overland Park, KS, Sioux Falls, SD, and Wichita, KS.
Source: Lincoln Parks & Recreation     LN Goal5     7/12/2013
About this measure:
The number of park playgrounds in Lincoln is compared against peer cities. National average for 75 largest cities is 2.2 park playgrounds per 10,000 residents. 2011 Park Facts prepared by the Trust for Public Lands.
Why this is important:
Playgrounds are standard neighborhood park features within Lincoln neighborhoods. Neighborhood parks are gathering spaces for outdoor recreation and social activities.
What is being done:
The Parks & Recreation Department manages 84 playgrounds in public park areas.



Source: Lincoln Parks & Recreation     LN Goal5     7/11/2013
About this measure:
The number of public recreation centers in Lincoln is compared against peer cities. National average for comparable cities is 0.5 recreation centers per 20,000 residents. 2011 Park Facts prepared by the Trust for Public Lands.
Why this is important:
A Department of Justice study identifies after-school and summer hours as a time when unsupervised youth are in greater peril of engaging in risky behaviors. Recreation centers help children fill these times with positive, supervised activities.
What is being done:
The Parks & Recreation Department manages seven neighborhood recreation and community centers.



Source: Library Department     LN Goal5     5/28/2014
About this measure:
The measurement indicates the number of people who use meeting rooms at any of the library’s six locations providing this service, or attend programs in the meeting rooms. Numbers are self-reported by community groups and organizations using the rooms. Library staff report head counts of library programs.
Why this is important:
Lincoln City Libraries, in response to the needs of community residents, provides meeting areas in six libraries for public use on a request basis. The goal of providing public meeting space within the Library is to raise community awareness of the Library’s educational and informational resources.
What is being done:
Booking software has recently been upgraded to allow meeting room users access to booking calendars to plan their meetings at a time convenient for them, freeing up staff for other activities.



Source: Library Department     LN Goal5     5/28/2014
About this measure:
This measurement represents the results from the Taking Charge Satisfaction of Residents of Lincoln, Nebraska in 2010 and 2012, as reported by the University of Nebraska Public Policy Center.
Why this is important:
Satisfaction with libraries was the highest of the City’s services reflecting the positive support of the library by its users.
What is being done:
Library Board and Administration continues to evaluate programs and services for overall effectiveness and efficiency.



Source: Library Department     LN Goal5     5/28/2014
About this measure:
The measure indicates the number of items checked out by customers of the library’s bookmobile. Numbers are gathered and reported on a monthly basis.
Why this is important:
LCL’s bookmobile provides individualized library services to a diverse population throughout Lincoln and Lancaster County. The bookmobile focuses service delivery to four main areas:
- County towns and County cities
- Youth with emphasis on children at risk (includes preschools and daycares)
- Seniors
- Areas in Lincoln not close to existing libraries
What is being done:
The library’s 1993 bookmobile, which missed on average 50 days of service per year due to mechanical problems, was replaced in 2012 with a new bookmobile fueled by compressed natural gas. The bookmobile was purchased with a combination of city (Keno) and county funds, and a federal energy grant. Remaining costs for balance of vehicle, library materials, and equipment were funded through private contributions.