Livable Neighborhoods

Goal 1: Provide for safe, clean and attractive neighborhoods to create desirable places to live
Source: Health Department     LN Goal1     5/22/2014
About this measure:
Dog bites account for about 165-170 injured patient visits to hospital emergency rooms each year in the City of Lincoln. This data is gathered anually from the Nebraska Hospital Association’s Hospital Discharge Data.
Why this is important:
Animal Control responded to 485 dog bites last year (September 1, 2011- August 31, 2012) but not all of these resulted in an emergency room visit. Reducing the number of people injured from dog bites is important because bites are very costly to victims and pet owners. They impact the costs of home owner’s insurance and they are a public health risk for rabies and other diseases.
What is being done:
Animal Control is working to increase pet owner responsibility; bites are often times the result of irresponsible owners and not the animal themselves. We are accomplishing this by increasing the number of pets vaccinated against rabies, increasing the number of licensed pets and enforcing the animal ordinances that are part of the Lincoln Municipal Code.



Source: Lincoln Parks & Recreation     LN Goal1     7/12/2013
About this measure:
Each of the four park districts maintains a log recording the beginning and ending date of each mowing cycle during the growing season. Any factors that affected a mowing cycle are recorded, such as equipment down for repair, weather conditions, and/or special events that affected availability of staffing.
Why this is important:
The frequency of mowing, or mowing cycle, is directly related to the physical appearance of park areas and the health and vigor of turf.
What is being done:
The Parks & Recreation Department has established a comprehensive approach to mowing and maintenance of grass areas based on use of park areas. Lower use “passive” areas are typically managed as “long grass” areas that are mowed one to three times per year. Long grass areas are managed to minimize weeds and volunteer woody vegetation. Active use areas are mowed about 12 to 13 times per year.



Source: Lincoln Parks & Recreation     LN Goal1     7/12/2013
About this measure:
Community Forestry staff maintains a log of tree maintenance work, including the number of street trees trimmed, for each fiscal year. The pruning cycle is calculated by comparing the total number of street trees with the number of street trees trimmed. Trends are monitored and compared against the benchmark of maintaining a ten-year pruning cycle for street trees.
Why this is important:
Street trees must receive regular pruning and trimming to establish and maintain adequate clearance over streets and sidewalks, and to maintain a healthy canopy. Trees that are not trimmed on a regular basis are more susceptible to disease and structural problems that can cause them to be a liability rather than a benefit. An average pruning cycle of four to 10 years depending on age of tree is recommended by the United State Department of Agriculture Forest Service to establish and sustain a cost / benefit ratio that is most cost-effective for maintaining public trees.
What is being done:
The Parks & Recreation Department employees fourteen arborists who manage 91,155 street trees, including trimming, removing diseased or damaged trees, and storm response.



Source: Lincoln Parks & Recreation     LN Goal1     7/12/2013
About this measure:
Community Forestry staff maintain a log of tree maintenance work, including the number of street trees removed and the number of street trees planted, for each fiscal year. The ratio of the number of street trees planted as compared to the number of street trees removed is calculated and compared against the benchmark.
Why this is important:
Street trees are regularly removed due to disease, damage or decline. Adequate resources are needed to assure that new replacement trees are planted to maintain street tree populations in established areas of the community.
What is being done:
New street trees are planted through no-cost tree planting permits, cost-share street tree vouchers, donations to the 2 for Trees utility billing donation program, City budget appropriations, grants and volunteer efforts.



Source: Lincoln Parks & Recreation     LN Goal1     7/12/2013
About this measure:
Community Forestry staff maintains a log of requests by community residents for services associated with street trees. The annual number of requests is compared to the total number of street trees to determine the ratio, and trends are monitored.
Why this is important:
Street trees must receive regular pruning and trimming to establish and maintain adequate clearance over streets and sidewalks, and to maintain a healthy canopy. Trees that are not trimmed on a regular basis are more susceptible to disease and structural problems that can cause them to be a liability rather than a benefit.
What is being done:
Residents regularly report concerns about street trees and request that work be completed. Community Forestry staff review and prioritize requests for service and attempt to respond to requests within a reasonable amount of time.



Maintain percentage of residents who rate maintenance of park areas as satisfactory or very satisfactory
2010 2012
Neighborhood Parks 80% (benchmark 83%) 75.3% (phone survey) 61.2% (mail survey)
Ballfields 80% (benchmark 83%) 85% (on-line survey)
Trails 90% (benchmark 91%) 92% (point-in-time) 92% (mail survey)
Golf Courses 85% (benchmark 89%) 87.3% (on-line survey)
Outdoor Pools 80% (benchmark 83%) 88.5% (point-in-time) 86.2% (point-in-time)
Medians & Boulevards 59.9% (mail survey)

About this measure:
Respondents are asked to rate maintenance of parks as part of the resident satisfaction survey conducted every two years. The Great Plains Trail Network conducts a survey every two years in which respondents are asked to rate maintenance of trails. Participants are asked to rate maintenance of outdoor pools, sports fields and golf courses annually. Trends in responses are compared against benchmarks from A Study of Public Opinions Regarding Parks and Recreation Services and Facilities in Lincoln, Nebraska, 2000*.
Why this is important:
Well maintained outdoor recreation facilities encourage participation in physical activities and enhance the appearance and identity of the surrounding neighborhoods. National studies indicate that well maintained park areas enhance values of nearby properties.
What is being done:
The Parks and Recreation Department manages 124 parks, 131 miles of trails, 60 sports fields, nine outdoor pools, seven recreation centers, and five public golf courses