Healthy and Productive People
Goal 5: Support community literacy issues
Source: Library Department     HP Goal5     6/24/2013
About this measure:
This measure indicates the time a library user must wait to have access to a computer with Internet access. The software system used by customers to make reservations measures the time waited by each customer for a reservation. Separate data is kept for each facility, but combined for an annual average.
Why this is important:
The rapid adoption of the Internet by all sectors of society has made it an indispensable part of our daily life. Access to Internet resources is taken for granted by public agencies providing services to the community, by businesses, and by individuals who use it to stay current on public affairs and just stay in touch with their families and friends. Not all individuals have consistent access to the Internet and depend on access at the public library to search for job opportunities, submit job applications online, work on their resumes, do schoolwork or online assignments, or apply for public assistance.
What is being done:
LCL continues to evaluate the time customers must wait to use the Internet understanding that a long wait means reduced access, reduced employment opportunities, reduced research opportunities or interaction with far-away family.



Source: Library Department     HP Goal5     5/28/2014
About this measure:
This measure counts the number of visits to all libraries (Main library, 7 branches, 1 bookmobile) with a separate count for the number of visitors to the library’s website – known to some as the virtual branch. Visits are measured at each site and combined here as the annual number.
Why this is important:
Measuring library visits per capita is important to resource allocations decisions. For instance, despite a large increase in the library’s internet access to material, the number of physical library visits has remained relatively stable.
What is being done:
LCL continues to monitor use, condition of collections, and condition of facilities, maximizing all avenues of access. Updated people counters are being installed to ensure accurate gate counts



Source: Library Department     HP Goal5     5/28/2014
About this measure:
This measure counts all youth who register for the summer reading program as well as those who successfully complete the program. The effectiveness of the program is evaluated annually. Population figures used for Lancaster County residents 14 years of age and younger is 54,512 based on 2010 census information.
Why this is important:
The Summer Reading Program engages youth in reading and literacy activities and encourages participation in programs and events that keep them entertained, busy, safe, and positively active during summer vacation. Summer reading advances literacy and academic performance by engaging children in reading and reading-related activities during the summer months and fosters a love of reading through programs and services.
What is being done:
LCL is part of The Collaborative Summer Library Program (CSLP), a consortium of states working together to provide high-quality summer reading program materials for children at the lowest cost possible for their public libraries. Participation in the Summer Reading Program prepares children for success by developing and maintaining language skills. Participants who complete the program earn prizes donated by local businesses.