Healthy & Productive People

Goal 3: Support vulnerable populations
Logoff
Source: Health Department     HP Goal3     10/27/2014
About this measure:
Lincoln Public Schools’ screening data is collected and reported through Student Health Services.

In order to fulfill a Nebraska State Statute, the Lincoln-Lancaster County Health Department (LLCHD) works collaboratively with Lincoln Public Schools (LPS) to coordinate school-based dental screenings in the elementary schools, using community volunteer dentists. The school screenings target children that have not reported seeing a dentist in the past 12 months.

The graph depicts the number of LPS elementary school aged children screened each year in comparison to total enrollment. This indicator provides a snap shot of access issues and dental needs of the LPS elementary school aged children. As an indicator and measureable outcome, LLCHD would like to reduce to 25% or less the number of children needing a dental screening because they have not seen a dentist in the past 12 months.
Why this is important:
The need for oral health care is the most prevalent unmet health care need among children and adolescents. Recent data sources reveal that one out of every 16 children in the United States does not receive needed oral health care because the family cannot afford it. Ignoring oral health problems in children and adolescents will only lead to needless pain and suffering, cause devastating complications toward their well-being and quality of life, with significant financial and social costs that burden society.
What is being done:
Children identified with early or urgent dental care needs are referred to community resources or dental providers that work with families enrolled in Medicaid and/or on reduced fees based on income. For children identified with urgent dental care needs, the LLCHD Dental Clinic works collectively with school nurses to assure access to care through reserved appointment slots and often at no fee to the families. For FY 2012, the LLCHD served 3464 patients with 9956 patient visits. Of those patients served, 1729 (50%) were children.



Source: Lincoln Parks & Recreation     HP Goal3     7/11/2013
About this measure:
Data is collected using participant surveys. A year-to-year benchmark comparison is being used to compare results over time.
Why this is important:
Program satisfaction by participants, parents and caregivers leads to greater participation. Participants should development meaningful connections with staff, feel safe, report personal growth in physical, social and life skills. Parents and caregivers should feel that participants are safe, activities are enriching, and that staff are responsive.
What is being done:
The Parks & Recreation Department offers adaptive recreation club programs to children and adults with intellectual and physical disabilities. These club programs provide opportunities for social interaction and for participation in recreation activities. In addition, the Department manages the Lincoln Shooting Stars Special Olympics program offering nine sports programs to children and adults.



Source: Aging-Mayors Department     HP Goal3     3/31/2014
About this measure:
Consumers of Aging Partners’ (AP) care coordination services are surveyed annually to determine the quality of care received using nationally recognized survey questions. This survey data is compiled and compared to 2011 Administration on Aging’s Integrated Database (AGID), 2011 National Survey of OAA Participants data.
Why this is important:
Helping older adults remain in their homes with a high quality of life allows seniors to live with dignity and allow them to avoid expensive nursing home care. AP maintains a staff of certified social workers available to work with older adults who may need help determining options as they age. By serving as advocates and guides, AP staff is able to stabilize situations and give older adults and/or their caregivers choices and options beyond institutional care.
What is being done:
All care coordination consumers participate in an assessment process that identifies needs. Working with their care coordinator, the older adult creates a care plan that includes client-centered goals. Examples of goals include setting up in-home services or applying for financial benefits. All consumers receive follow-up services and care plans are adjusted as needed.



Source: Aging-Mayors Department     HP Goal3     3/28/2013
About this measure:
Aging Partners (AP) consumer data is collected and compared to the 2011 Administration on Aging’s Integrated Database (AGID), 2011 State Program Reports data. ADL is a term used in healthcare to refer to daily self-care activities. Health professionals routinely refer to the ability or inability to perform ADLs as a measurement of the functional status of a person, particularly in regards to people with disabilities and the elderly. ADLs measured include bathing, dressing, eating, toileting, transferring and walking. Most individuals with three or more ADL deficits need a nursing home level of care. Individuals may continue to safely live at home with ADL supports.
Why this is important:
People who live alone are at higher risk of nursing home entry because they may be isolated or lack necessary supports. Studies show that physical functioning is an important factor impacting whether a senior citizen needs nursing home care. People who have difficulty performing activities of daily living (ADL) are at an even higher risk. AP targets care coordination and in-home services to those who have ADL deficits to provide the supports necessary to keep older adults in their own homes and communities longer.
What is being done:
In-home services that help older adults and caregivers are offered on a sliding scale fee either through contracts with local providers or through Handyman services coordinated by AP. A contract with Tabitha ensures that homebound Lincoln residents have access to a nutritious meal seven days a week, 365 days a year. AP maintains a staff of certified social workers who work with older adults and/or caregivers to assess needs and implement solutions.