Environmental Quality

Goal 3: Effectively manage wastewater and solid waste (including recycling)
Source: Public Works and Utilities Department     EQ Goal3     11/2/2012
About this measure:
A stoppage is recorded anytime a sanitary sewer overflow occurs that is a result of a system component failure. The City’s goal is to maintain a ratio of two or less stoppages per 100 miles of sanitary sewer pipeline, the national benchmarking standard for sanitary sewer collection systems.
Why this is important:
Stoppages, also known as sanitary sewer overflows, occur when untreated wastewater from the sanitary sewer collection system overflows out of the pipes or manholes into City streets, waterways, or into structures, including basements. The cause of stoppages is often the presence of roots, grease or pipe defects within the sanitary sewer collection system. These stoppages events can create significant property damage, environmental contamination and health risks.
What is being done:
Lincoln Wastewater Collection carries out a yearly maintenance program to limit the number of stoppages occurring. Included in this program is approximately: 500 miles of pipe cleaning by high velocity water jetting, 100 miles of video inspection, 150 spot repairs, and 75 miles of root control. Additionally, there is approximately $ 2.2 million spent annually to upgrade, replace, and repair the existing sanitary sewer collection system.



Source: Public Works and Utilities Department     EQ Goal3     7/9/2013
About this measure:
Lincoln residents and businesses divert (recycle and/or compost) approximately 18% of the solid waste they produce and send the remaining 82% to the landfill. For the purposes of this indicator, municipal solid waste does not include construction and demolition wastes.
Why this is important:
Recycling and composting helps extend the life of the City's landfill. Recycling and other programs that divert wastes from disposal in landfills have economic, environmental, health and social benefits. Lincoln's 18% diversion rate lags behind most of the nation’s communities. The U.S. EPA estimated the average nationwide recycling rate at 34% in 2011.
What is being done:
An Advisory Committee is currently developing recommendations to guide the management of solid wastes in Lincoln. Future solid waste management systems, facilities and programs are likely to further emphasize resource conservation, source reduction, waste diversion and resource recovery, and thus reduce the community’s long-term dependence on landfilling.



Source: Public Works and Utilities Department     EQ Goal3     3/21/2013
About this measure:
This measure identifies the average concentration of pollutants discharged to Salt Creek as compared with the limits imposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ). The data is collected by taking daily samples of treated wastewater discharged into Salt Creek.
Why this is important:
The three discharged pollutants (ammonia, organic pollutants, and suspended solids) can impact the quality of the creek water and harm aquatic life. In addition, controlling the discharges have financial impact on the City as the EPA can impose penalties as high as $25,000 per day for each day a facility is out of compliance with the discharge limits.
What is being done:
The Lincoln Wastewater System maintains and improves its facilities with sustainable processes and infrastructure to meet these limits. The treatment processes are operated and monitored by licensed operates 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. The treated wastewater discharged from the plant is sampled and tested for compliance with the imposed limits.



Source: Public Works and Utilities Department     EQ Goal3     3/21/2013
About this measure:
This measure identifies the average concentration of pollutants discharged to Salt Creek as compared with the limits imposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ). The data is collected by taking daily samples of treated wastewater discharged into Salt Creek.
Why this is important:
The three discharged pollutants (ammonia, organic pollutants, and suspended solids) can impact the quality of the creek water and harm aquatic life. In addition, controlling the discharges have financial impact on the City as the EPA can impose penalties as high as $25,000 per day for each day a facility is out of compliance with the discharge limits.
What is being done:
The Lincoln Wastewater System maintains and improves its facilities with sustainable processes and infrastructure to meet these limits. The treatment processes are operated and monitored by licensed operates 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. The treated wastewater discharged from the plant is sampled and tested for compliance with the imposed limits.