Efficient Transportation

Goal 1: Provide, maintain, and support safe, convenient, durable and efficient transportation infrastructure
Source: Public Works and Utilities Department     ET Goal1     6/3/2015
About this measure:
On-going vehicle and pedestrian counts are collected annually by the City of Lincoln at several signalized intersection locations. These counts are collected during the AM, Noon, and PM peak periods of the day to assist in the evaluation of intersection operations. By utilizing analysis software, average vehicle delay at intersections can be calculated so that opportunities for improvements can be planned for. At 42 of the 351 traffic signalized intersections in Lincoln, the overall average vehicle delay is 35 seconds or more during the peak hour periods.
Why this is important:
Increasing vehicle delays result in excessive fuel consumption, degraded air quality and increased travel times. In addition, poorly timed traffic signals contribute to an increase number of vehicle crashes.
What is being done:
Traffic signals are monitored daily for operation and maintenance needs, and required communications infrastructure to signals is kept in proper working condition. Several different time of day signal timing plans are operated throughout the City each day, including special event timing plans for specific large-scale events. The City of Lincoln is currently undertaking planning efforts for implementation of next generation traffic signal hardware and software that will improve the efficiency and safety of traffic.



Source: Planning Department     ET Goal1     4/15/2014
About this measure:
The information for this indicator comes from the American Community Survey which is collected and compiled annually by the U.S. Census Bureau. The data includes all commuters whether they are driving alone, carpooling, using transit, cycling, walking or commuting by another means. Commute times must be viewed in context. While they are a general measure of traffic congestion, increases in cycling, walking, and mass transit could increase the commute time average but help reduce congestion by removing single car drivers from the road.
Why this is important:
A relatively short commute time is an important aspect of quality of life. Longer commute times can mean increases in congestion, worsening air quality, and increased demand for expensive roadway expansions that may or may not be effective. Short commute times can also be indicative of a shorter distance between work and home as well as a more efficient development pattern. Minimizing commute time and distance allows residents the opportunity to choose between driving, cycling, walking and public transit which further improves air quality, reduces government expenditures on road infrastructure and encourages community engagement.
What is being done:
The Planning Department, along with many other departments, has worked extensively with the general public, civic groups as well as City and County departments over the past several years to develop an updated Comprehensive Plan (LPLan 2040), an updated 2040 Long-Range Transportation Plan (http://lincoln.ne.gov/city/plan/lplan2040/index.htm) and a new Bicycle and Pedestrian Capital Plan. All of these plans lay out steps for the City to take to keep Lincoln’s congestion minimal while increasing the availability of safe, convenient and cost effective transit, cycling and walking choices. Further, the Public Works and Utilities Department has worked at length to improve the timing of traffic signals to make them function as efficiently as possible.



Source: Public Works and Utilities Department     ET Goal1     3/28/2013
About this measure:
A data collection van drives Lincoln streets to rate their pavement conditions as either “very good”, “good”, “fair”, or “poor.”
Why this is important:
Numerous studies have shown that spending $1 on preventive roadway maintenance now SAVES between $8 and $12 dollars on more expensive reactionary work later. Identifying street pavement conditions and reacting before they become “fair” or “poor” saves taxpayer dollars.
What is being done:
Wheel tax funding increases have allowed for more of the preventative maintenance activities to be accomplished and extend street life. Citizens are encouraged to report street defects such as potholes and cracks for repairs so that they can be fixed at a minor level before they become a more costly problem. The city has repaired 14.8, 7.2, and 16.9 miles of arterial streets over the last three years (2010-2012). Residential rehabilitations have completed over 200 blocks in that same time period.